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Home >> Issues >> Corporate Accountability >> Corporate corruption and collusion

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Corporate corruption and collusion

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The standard practice by agrochemical representatives to slip back and forth between government and corporate posts in industrialised nations, known as the “revolving door”, has allowed agrochemical corporations to shape national and international policies to their advantage and expand their markets worldwide. Many of the agrochemical industry's former executives, lawyers and scientists serve in the government agencies that are charged with keeping watch over their industries. The revolving door between business and government is an effective trick to sway regulations in favor of corporate interests. The public view this practice as tantamount with corrupt activities, which has been corroborated by several scandals in the regulatory process of pesticides.

In the United States, hundreds of men and women have moved in and out through “revolving doors” as federal regulators, directors, commissioners, and scientists of companies they are supposed to regulate.

The World Bank has encouraged this “revolving door” with corporations, facilitating their appointment as consultants in food and agriculture programmes for/in developing countries. This has also permitted them to operate freely with minimum risk of prosecution.

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